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Jewelry Glossary

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14-karat Gold Electroplated: metal jewelry that features a thin layer of 14-karat gold plating, achieved by immersing the base metal into a chemical solution through which an electric current flows to bond or adhere the desired 14-karat gold coating to the lesser-valued metal.

Agate: as a microcrystalline variety of silica or volcanic rock, agate is a striped version of chalcedony quartz, popular for its durability, versatility and spectrum of colors. Fun Fact: Onyx is a common form of agate.

Amethyst: a violet or purple variety of quartz, which is a popular jewelry adornment. The deeper the violet hue, the greater the value. Fun Fact: Amethyst is the birthstone for the month of February and the traditional gift given to couples celebrating a 6th or 17th wedding anniversary. Folklore: The wearing of amethyst stones was believed to prevent intoxication or drunkenness during the Greco-Roman era.

Amulet: a charm, trinket or object worn, typically fashioned as jewelry and believed to ward off evil and bring good luck to the wearer. Hence the term “good luck charm”.

Antique: an object or period piece of jewelry crafted 100 or more years in the past. “Antiqued” jewelry is contemporary jewelry fashioned to appear aged through darkening or tarnishing techniques.

Art Deco: jewelry styled in an ornamental or lavish design characterized by geometric shapes, angles and/or inlaid precious metals or gemstones.

Aquamarine: also referred to in antiquity as beryl or “precious blue-green or color-of-sea-water stone”, aquamarine is a highly coveted gemstone and popular jewelry adornment. Fun Fact: Aquamarine is the birthstone for the month of March and the traditional gift given to couples celebrating a 19th wedding anniversary. Folklore: Sailors believed Aquamarine stones would protect them from harm while at sea and had the power to prevent seasickness and cure stomach ailments.

Australian Opal: as a semi-precious stone comprised of silica and water and varying in optic density from opaque to semi-transparent, opal is the national gemstone of Australia. Australian Opals feature a remarkable brilliance and iridescence, characterized by the refraction of light in a rainbow of colors that change according to the angle of observation. Fun Fact: Opal is the traditional birthstone for the month of October.

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Baguette: a style of gemstone cut, characterized by long rectangles. French for the "rod”, baguettes are popular shapes frequently set on either side of a focal diamond.

Bangle: a rigid, often round, bracelet that is large enough to slip over the hand and wrist without the need for an opening or clasp; Dissimilar to a cuff bracelet, which features an opening.

Barrel Clasp: used for connecting two components of jewelry together, typically used as a clasp-type closure for necklaces or bracelets. This style of clasp features barrel-shaped threaded ends that screw together for quick and secure fastening.

Bezel Setting: a type of decorative setting that encircles or partially covers the sides of a gemstone, extending slightly above the crown. Fun Fact: Bezel settings are ideal for those with active lifestyles.

Bridal Set: a complimentary engagement and wedding ring set, designed to fit together both physically and stylistically.

Box Clasp: on one end, this style of clasp features a box with an opening, which is notched. The other end has a flat piece ofmetal folded over to form a spring with a knob at the end. This knob creates a metal spring that slips into the hole in the “box” and locks for secure fastening.

Brushed Finish: is a process designed to reduce a surfaces reflection, achieved by brushing a wire or metal brush or polishing tool over a given surface to produce texture.

Buckle Clasp: resembling a belt buckle in both functionality and appearance, this type of clasp is commonly featured on non-metal watchbands.

Ball Earrings: a variety of earrings characterized by a single round stud, ball or cluster of tiny jewels attached to a post, suspended to a ring that is attached to a hook wire or directly attached to a hook wire.

Bead Pendant: derived from the French word “pendant” meaning hanging, a bead pendant is a decorative piece of jewelry characterized by a cluster of beads attached to a small loop and suspended or hung from a necklace, pin or earring, or a single, focal bead looped through and suspended from a necklace.

Bead Setting: a type of decorative setting in which gemstones are set flush with the surface of the metal and secured with small, bead-like prongs.

Brooch: An ornamental piece of jewelry designed to attach to a garment of clothing with a pinandclasp.

Bib Necklace: a popular style of a short necklace that is characterized by multiple strands of flowing ornaments in the front. A Bib Necklace is also known as a collarette.

Black Diamond: as the hardest known natural mineral to man, and classified as one of the four precious gemstones (i.e., diamonds, rubies, sapphires and emeralds), Black Diamonds derive their color from Magnetite, Hematite and Iron mineral inclusions in the stone. Fun Fact: Originating from the Greek word adama, meaning “invincible”, Diamonds are the birthstone for the month of April and the traditional gift given to couples celebrating a 10th, 60th or 75th wedding anniversary.

Black Opal: as the rarest type of opal, a natural black or dark background characterizes Black Opal that, similar to white opal, refracts a rainbow of colors that change according to the angle of observation.

Black Sapphire: a variety of corundum, and classified as one of the four precious gemstones (i.e., diamonds, rubies, sapphires and emeralds), Black Sapphires derive their dark hue from the presence of Titanium and Iron mineral inclusions in the stone.

Blue Topaz: avariety of topazthat is colorless or light brown when mined but turns a vivid blue when exposed to heat. Fun Fact: Blue Topaz is an alternatebirthstonefor the month of December and is the traditional gift given to couples celebrating the 4th year of marriage.

Body Jewelry: ornamental jewelry worn on various parts of the body, typically referring tobelly or toe rings,nose studs,tongue bars, and jewelry designed forpiercedlips, eyebrows, nipples, or any other skin surface.

Box Setting: a type of decorative setting where the gemstone is set in a metal “box”, the edges of which are pressed against the girdle of the stone to secure it in place. Fun Fact: Box Settings are sometimes referred to as a Gypsy Mounts.

Box Chain: a classic style of chain featuring small box-like links of metal that fit together in a continuous pattern.

Brass: a yellow-colored alloycomprised of equal parts copperand zinc, sometimes used to create costume jewelry.

Brilliant-Full Cut: not to be confused with the shape of a round stone, Brilliant-Full Cut is a style of gemstone cut characterized by 56 to 58facets, fashionedto maximize the volume of light reflected from the inside the stone to produce the greatest“brilliance”. Fun Fact: Round stones are the most common shape of brilliant-cut stones; however, oval, pear, marquise and heart-shaped stones may also feature a brilliant cut.

Briolette: a style of gemstone cut characterized by a pear-shaped teardrop or elongated pendant.

Buckle Ring: a decorative style of ring designed to resemble the appearance of a belt buckle, with or without the functionality of a buckle clasp. Folklore: Buckle rings were symbolic of a close relationship between the giver and the wearer during the Victorian era.

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Cable Chain: a style of chain characterized by metal ovals, strung together in a continuous, rotating pattern.

Cabochon: a style of gemstone cut, characterized by a rounded, domed surface with no facets. Fun Fact: Opals, jade, moonstone and turquoise are frequently fashioned into the style of a cabochon.

Cameo: a method of decorative carving whereby a jewelry item features a raised, 3-dimensional scene or image of one color and a background of another. Fun Fact: Cameos are frequently portraits or profiles of women and have been popular since the Hellenistic period.

Carat Weight: not to be confused with Karat weight, which is the measure of the purity of agoldalloy, Carat Weight is a measure used to determine the weight of a diamond gemstone. Diamonds are measured to the nearest hundredth or point of a Carat. Thus, a stone weighing .10 Carats is 1/10 the size of a diamond measured at one full Carat, which is 100 points. See also Karat Weight.

Channel Setting: a type of decorative setting where the gemstones are set side by side in a grooved channel.

Choker: a close-fitting style of necklace worn tightly around the neck like a collar.

Citrine: a yellow variety of quartz, which is a popular jewelry adornment. Fun Fact: Originating from the French word citron meaning “lemon”, Citrine is the birthstone for the month of November and the traditional gift given to couples celebrating a 13th wedding anniversary. Folklore: Revered as a gift of the sun in ancient times, Citrine was believed to be a powerful antidote to the effects of a viper's venom.

Clasp: any type of attachment designed to join one end of a piece of jewelry to another.

Cluster Setting: a type of decorative setting where the gemstones are grouped together in a “cluster” to create a unique design or to resemble one larger stone.

Coral: a calcium carbonate (skeleton-like) structure secreted by coral marine animals, which is highly valued for its intense, reddish-pink coloration and glossiness. Folklore: It was believed that coral protected the wearer from harm, making it a popular Victorian-era gift for children.

Crystal: a mineral solid whose atoms form a regular structure or a reference to high-quality glass invented in 17th-century England, which contains 10% lead oxide. Fun Fact: Common mineral crystals include quartz, diamonds, emeralds and even tablesalt.

 

Curb Link Chain: a style of chain characterized by oval-shaped links that are twisted or diamond cut to lie flat, and linked together in a continuous pattern.

Cushion Cut: a square style of gemstone cut characterized by rounded edges, like a cushion.

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Diamond Cut: in the context of objects (usually metal objects), diamond cut references a pattern of angled, decorative cuts on the surface of an item of jewelry. When referencing gemstones, diamond cut is the same as a “BrilliantCut".

Edwardian: the period covering the reign ofKing Edward VII, 1901 to 1910, Edwardian jewelry is delicate and elegant characterized by frequent use of pearls, diamonds, bows and intricate filigrees in platinum and white gold.

Electroplated: a piece of jewelry coated with a higher-valued metal using electricity. See also 14-karat Gold Electroplated.

Emerald: found in all shades of green and classified as one of the four precious gemstones (i.e., diamonds, rubies, sapphires and emeralds), emerald stones are members of the beryl family. Fun fact: Emeralds are the birthstone for the month of May and the traditional gift given to couples celebrating a 20th, 35th or 55th wedding anniversary. Folklore: Emeralds were thought to give the wearer magical or psychic powers, as well as improving eyesight and fertility, and in Irish culture, emeralds represent success.

Emerald-Cut: a style of gemstone cut, characterized by a rectangular or square-cut stone featuring beveled corners and a step cut. Fun Fact: This is a common cut used to fashion emerald gemstones; hence the name.

Engrave: an etching or gouging technique where a design or marking is impressed into the surface of a piece of jewelry with a tool; Dissimilar to emboss, which is a technique used to create a raised design.

Enamel: colored,opaqueglassy material that is fused onto the surface of metal jewelry for decorative purposes.

Estate Jewelry: jewelry acquired from the estate of another, whether or not the previous owner has passed. Collectable-quality estate jewelry can include antique and vintage pieces.

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Faux: a French term meaning false, fake or imitation.

Filigree: an intricate and often elaborate decorative technique where thin wire strands of gold, silver or other precious metals are interlaced, twisted, braided or fashioned into rosettes, scrolls, vines or spirals.

Fishhook Clasp: resembling a fisherman’s hook in both functionality and appearance, this style of clasp features a hook on one end and a metal loop on the other. The hook is inserted through the loop to “clasp” two jewelry components together.

Flush Setting: a type of decorative setting where gemstones are placed inside holes that have been cut into the surface of metal, leaving only the tops of the stones visible.

Formica: a durable plastic laminate.

Foxtail Chain: resembling the fullness of a foxtail, this style of chain features intricately wovenoval-shaped linksmade up of three rows.

Freshwater Pearl: a pearlproduced by a mollusk that inhabits a body of fresh water (e.g., non-saline ponds, lakes or rivers), as opposed to salt water. Fun Fact: Mollusks that produce Freshwater Pearls do not require an irritant inserted into to the valve to produce a pearl; thus, Freshwater Pearls are characterized by uneven shapes and are rarely perfectly round.

Friction Back: a small metal or plastic backing featuring a hole that is pushed onto an earring's post to prevent the earring from slipping.

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Garnet: named after the seeds of the pomegranate fruit, garnet is a silicate that varies in color from red to green. Fun Fact: Red Garnet is the birthstone for the month of January. Folklore: It was believed that the wearer ofgarnet jewelrywas kept in good health and protected while traveling on long journeys. Garnets stones were also worn to signify truth and faith.

Gemstone: a variety of rare minerals highly coveted for their beauty and monetary value, which in cut and polished form are fashioned into jewelry adornments. Fun Facts: Of the two gemstone classifications (precious and semi-precious), diamonds, rubies, sapphires and emeralds are classified as precious stones, with all others being semi-precious. Certain rocks (e.g., lapis) and organic materials (e.g., amber), which are not minerals, are often fashioned as gemstones.

Gold Filled: refers to a piece of jewelry with a layer of gold applied to the base metal that is equal to 1/20th of the entire piece of jewelry.

Gold Plated: refers to metal or a piece of jewelry with a wafer-thin coating ofgoldthat has been either electroplated or mechanically bonded onto thebase metal’s surface. See also 14-karat Gold Electroplated.

Hammered Finish: a metal surface finish characterized by a wavy texture, created by using a soft, rounded hammer.

High-Polish Finish: a metal surface finish that is shiny and reflective.

Hinged Backs: a popular style of backing for hoop earrings, hinged backs feature a metal piece inserted through the pierced earlobe, which snaps into a latch on the opposite side of the earring.

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Inlaid Setting: a type of decorative setting where a portion of the metal has been cut away or hollowed out and replaced by gemstones, leaving the stones flush with the metal surface.

Inlay: a technique in which part of the surface of a piece of jewelry is cut away or hollowed out to create a decorative design. The cut-away is then embedded with gems, mother-of-pearl or some other substance and then leveled with the surface of the jewelry. Fun Fact: Inlays are a very popular and distinctive characteristic of Art Deco jewelry.

Ivory: a hard, smooth yellowish-white substance, also known as dentine, made from the tusks of elephants, walruses and hippos, and in rare cases, the teeth of sperm whales.

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Jade: anopaquegemstonecommonly found in shades of green, but also found in shades of lavender and rose. Folklore: Jade was the imperial gem for Chinese dynasties of antiquity, and in present-day China, many wearers of the stone believe it powerful enough to ward off sickness, evil spirits and bad luck.

Karat: not to be confused with Carat weight, which is the measure for the diamond gemstone, Karat Weight is a measure of the purity of agoldalloy. Gold is oftenalloyedor mixed with other metals, such as silver or copper, to improve its strength and durability. Thus, jewelry marked 24K is 100% pure gold, jewelry marked 18K is only 75% pure gold, and jewelry marked 14K is only 58.5% pure gold.See also Carat Weight.

Lever Back Earring: a popular style for earrings where the hook curves downward through the pierced earlobe connecting with a clasp on thebackside of theearlobe for secure fastening.

Lobster-Claw Clasp: used for connecting two components of jewelry together, typically used as a clasp-type closure for necklaces or bracelets. On one end, this style of clasp features a wide flat hook, which resembles the claw of a lobster with a hinged, spring-powered arm. The receiving end has an open ring, which the claw hooks onto for secure fastening.

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Marcasite: amineralwith the same composition aspyrite (a.k.a. fool’s gold) but differing in crystal structure. Fun Fact: Marcasite can befacetedlike agemstoneand is often used as an adornment insterling silverjewelry.

Marquise: named for the Marquise de Pompadour, Mistress of King Louis XV, a marquise (Mar-KEYS) is an oval-shapedgemstonewith tapered, pointed ends.

Mixed-Cut: a diamond cut that combines the qualities of both brilliant and step cuts.

MM: an abbreviation for the word millimeter, which is the standard unit of measurement for most jewelry dimensions. Common MM-to-inch conversions are listed below:

3MM = approx. 1/8 inches
6MM = approx. 1/4 inches
13MM = approx. 1/2 inches
19MM = approx. 3/4 inches
25MM = approx. 1 inches
50MM = approx. 2 inches
75MM = approx. 3 inches

Mother of Pearl: Thepearlescentor iridescent inner lining (also called nacre) ofmolluskshells likeabalone, oysters, and mussels, which is frequently used asinlayon a variety ofjewelry.

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Omega Back: similar to a lever-backed earring, the post goes through the pierced earlobe and the omega back, a hinged, curved lever with a circular opening on top, bends upwards toward the back of the earlobe, to securely fasten the earring in place.

Onyx: a semi-precious variety of chalcedony quartz that consists of parallel bands of white and black.Fun Fact: Black onyx is the traditional gift given to couples celebrating the 7th year of marriage. Folklore: An Indian superstition holds that the wearing of a black onyx necklace will cool feelings of love.

Opal: as an iridescent semi-precious stone, opals are made of silica and water and feature a remarkable brilliance and iridescence, characterized by the refraction of light in a rainbow of colors that change according to the angle of observation. Fun Fact: Opals are the birthstone for the month of October. See also Australian Opal. Folklore: Treasured in the Middle Ages as the “eye stone”, opals were believed to improve eyesight and enhance the mental capacities of the wearer. In Arabic lore, it was further believed that opals fell from heaven in flashes of lightning, thus receiving their fierycolors.

Oval: a style of gemstone cut in which the stone has an elongated round shape.

 

Pavé Setting: a type of decorative setting where multiple small stones are set close together resembling the paving done with bricks.

Pear-Shaped Cut: a decorative style of cut where the gemstone is shaped like a pear or a teardrop.

Pearl: smooth, luminousorganic gemstones produced by a mollusk’s secretion of nacre (composite material) in response to an irritant. Fun Fact: Pearls are the birthstone for the month of June and the traditional gift given to couples celebrating the 30th year of marriage. Folklore: Early Chinese believed that pearls fell from the sky when dragons fought, and early Greeks believed the wearing of pearls ensured marital bliss.

Pendant: derived from the French word “pendant” meaning hanging, a pendant is a decorative piece of jewelry, typically attached to a small loop and suspended or hung from a necklace, pin or earring.

Peridot: also known as “evening emerald”, Peridot is a semi-precious stone characterized by a transparent, yellow-green color that exhibits double refraction; things appear doubled when looking through the stone. Fun Fact: Peridot is the birthstone for the month of August and the traditional gift given to couples celebrating a 16th wedding anniversary.

Pink Gold: also called “Rose” or “Red” Gold, Pink Gold is an alloy mixture created by combining pure gold with varying amounts of copper to achieve a particular reddish hue.

Platinum: one of the three precious metals (i.e., gold, silver and platinum), platinum is valued for its white color and purity.

Precious Metal: a metal that is valued for its color, malleability, and rarity, of which there are only three: gold, silverandplatinum.

Precious Stone: a class of four rare gemstones, including diamonds, rubies, sapphires and emeralds.

Princess-Cut: a decorative style of gemstone cut characterized by a square-shaped stone.

Prong Setting: also referred to as a claw setting, prong settings feature smallmetalprongsfitted tightly over thegirdleof agemto hold it securely in place.

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Radiant Cut: a style of gemstone cut characterized by an eight-sided rectangular or square-cut stone with 70 facets.

Rhinestone: a variety of highly reflective glass fashioned to resemblegemstones.

Rhodium: although a liquid in its raw and natural state, Rhodium is a white precious metal and member of the platinum family, used to plate precious and base metals to create a hard, platinum-like sheen.

Rhodium Plating: the process of plating precious and base metals to create a hard, tarnish-resistant sheen.

Rope Chain: a style of chain characterized by a series of small oval-shaped links arranged in a spiral design that resembles woven rope.

Rose Gold: also called “Pink” or “Red” Gold, Rose Gold is an alloy mixture created by combining pure gold with varying amounts of copper to achieve a particular reddish hue.

Round Brilliant-Cut: having 57 to 58 facets and also known as “ideal”, this style of gemstone cut is designed to maximize a stones fire (flashes of rainbow colors) and scintillation. Round Brilliant-Cut stones are renowned for their ideal crown, pavilion and girdle symmetries.

Ruby: a variety of corundum that varies in color from red to purple to pink to brown, and classified as one of the four precious gemstones (i.e., diamonds, rubies, sapphires and emeralds), rubies derive their reddish hue from chromium dioxide. Fun Fact: Rubies are the birthstone for the month of July and are the traditional gift given to couples celebrating a 15th or 40th wedding anniversary. Along with Sapphires, Rubies are second only to diamonds on the Moh’s Scale of hardness. Folklore: Rubies have long symbolized power, royalty, charity, love and passion, and, in ancient cultures, were laid beneath the foundation of a building’s structure to bring good fortune.

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Sapphire: found in shades of blue, pink, red, yellow, green, white, purple and black, and classified as one of the four precious gemstones (i.e., diamonds, rubies, sapphires and emeralds), sapphires are members of the corundum family. Fun Fact: Blue Sapphire is the traditional birthstone for the month of September, and red corundum is classified as a Ruby. Sapphires are second only to diamonds on the Moh’s Scale of hardness. Folklore: Ancient Persians believed the Earth rested upon an enormous blue sapphire and that its reflection caused the blueness of the sky.

Satin Finish: a textured, metal surface finish characterized by a soft luster rather than a shine, achieved by brushing, sandblasting or chemically altering the surface of the metal.

Semi-Precious Stones: all gemstones that are not classified as precious. See also Gemstones.

Silver (Metal): naturally occurring in pure form, silver is one of the three precious metals (i.e., gold, silver and platinum).

Slide: a piece of decorative jewelry or pendant that slides along the length of a necklace or chain acting as a centerpiece.

Snake Chain: also known as a Brazilian chain, this style of chain resembles the body of a snake as thin bands of metal are closely secured together to form a flexible tube.

Snap-Lock Clasp: commonly used to secure hoop earrings, this type of clasp features a hinged piece of metal that goes through the pierced earlobe, “snapping” into a latch on the opposite side of the earring.

Solitaire: a single, “solitary”, or focal gemstone mounted in a simple setting.

Spring Ring Clasp: invented in the early 1900s, and by far the most common form of necklace fastening, a spring ring features a hollow, circular metal fastening with a spring opening on one end. A tiny spring keeps the arm of this clasp closed until such time that deliberate pressure is applied.

Stainless Steel: a corrosion-resistant steel alloy containing a minimum of 11% chromium by mass.

Stick Pin: a decorative jewelry ornament fashioned on top of a metal pin and worn vertically to accent or secure scarves, ties or collar lapels.

Step-Cut: a decorative gemstone cut characterized by rows of facets parallel to the girdle of the gemstone, positioned in a step-like fashion.Fun Fact: The majority of step-cut gemstones feature a four-sided, rectangular shape such as emeralds or baguette diamonds.

Sterling Silver: a high-quality silver alloy containing 925 (92.5%) partssilverto 75 (7.5%) parts of anothermetal, typicallyCopper, hence the 925 marking to guarantee the concentration of silvercontent.

Swarovski Crystal: containing 32% lead to maximize refraction, Swarovski Crystals are prized and valued for their precision cuts and clarity, despite being a high-quality glass.

Tanzanite: discovered in Tanzania in 1967, Tanzanite is prized for its bluish-purple hues. Fun Fact: Tanzanite is an alternative birthstone for the month of December and serves as a traditional gift given to couples celebrating a 24th wedding anniversary.

Tarnish: a process whereby the surface of metal experiences a dulling of its luster or finish, either caused by a thin deposit of a dirt or a reaction betweenmetalsand other chemicals (e.g., silvertarnishes as a reaction to sulfur).

Teardrop-Shaped: a decorative style of gemstone cut characterized by a rounded bottom edge that comes to a point at the top, resembling a “teardrop”.

Tension Setting: a type of decorative setting where the gemstone is placed between points of “tension” where two pieces of spring-loaded metal meet, leaving the stone to appear suspended.

Three-Piece Set: a matching trio set of bridal jewelry consisting of the bride’s engagement and wedding rings and the groom’s wedding band.

Tiara: a variation of a decorative, jeweled headdress or crown. Fun Fact: Contemporary tiaras are contoured with a rise in the front base to create the illusion of height.

Titanium: weighing 1/3 less than gold, Titanium is a metallic element prized for its range of colors when exposed to heat.

Tiffany Setting: introduced by Tiffany & Co. circa 1886, this decorative ring setting features an elevated, six-pronged solitaire diamond on a simple, circular band.

Toggle Clasp: this type of clasp features a metal bar on one end of a jewelry component that fits through a small metal ring on the opposite end. When flat, the bar secures the ends together.

Tongue Clasp: a V-shaped, flat clasp resembling a “tongue” that securely fits into a box on the opposite end of a jewelry component.

Torsade: a decorative style of necklace characterized by many strands that are twisted or interwoven together.

Tourmaline: a crystalline silicate gemstone prized for having the greatest spectrum of colors for all stones. Fun Fact: Tourmaline is the traditional gift given to couples celebrating an 8th wedding anniversary.

Trillion-Cut: a decorative, brilliant-cut gemstone characterized by a triangular shape having 44 facets.

Trademark: a distinct “marking” stamped, engraved or embossed on a piece of jewelry intended to identify its artisan or manufacturer.

Trembler: a decorative ornament attached to a piece of jewelry by a spring.

Triplet: a variety of manufactured stones created by compressing three thin layers of separate stone materials together.

Trombone Clasp: mimicking the action of a trombone, a trombone clasp has a piece of metal on one side that slides in and out securing the pin into place.

Tube Clasp: this type of clasp features a plunger section that slides smoothly into a larger “tube”, locking securely into place.

Tungsten: a rare, naturally occurring metal that is four times harder than Titanium and notably resistant to corrosion.

Turquoise: a non-translucent, porous semi-precious gemstone featuring intense color variations from sky-blue to green. Fun Fact: Turquoise is the national stone for the country of Iran and serves as an alternative birthstone for the month of December.

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Vermeil: a variety of gold-plated Sterling Silver.

Victorian: the period covering the reign ofQueen Victoria, 1837 to 1901, characterized by delicate designs with elaborate engraving, floral or nature-inspired themes, mosaic jewelry, cameo brooches and stick pins. Fun Fact: Two distinct types of jewelry originated during this era: Cannatille jewelry (elaborate, twisted strands of gold wire) and Repousse jewelry (solid forms with raised and fluted edges).

Vintage: not to be confused with antique, estate or costume jewelry, the term vintage refers to a class of jewelry that is characterized by unique and stylish designs, crafted at least 25 years in the past starting from the 1920s.

White Gold: a metal alloy comprised of Nickel and Copper, sometimes containing Zinc and Palladium.

White Metal: also known as “Pot Metal”, White Metal is any combination ofwhite-colored alloys and non-precious metals such as Zinc, Lead and Tin.

Yellow Gold: a metal alloy comprised of Gold, Copper, and Silver.

 


 

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